Gray Dogwood – “Gray Dogwood” by Cranbrook Science is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Gray Dogwood Flowers by Cranbrook Science Licensed Under CC BY 2.0"Fragile Forktail on Gray Dogwood" by Benny Mazur is licensed by CC BY 2.0

Dogwood, Gray – 12-24″ (2-0)

Gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa) is a multi-stemmed shrub reaching heights of 10 feet and widths of up to 9 feet.  It is moderately shade tolerant, growing in full or partial sun.  It is also a very versatile shrub, which grows well in poor soil conditions.  Although it can tolerate dry or moist sites and a broad range of soil types, it prefers well-drained soil.  Gray dogwood forms a rounded profile and is sometimes used as hedges.  It is resistant to drought.

SKU: GD-1224. Categories: , .

Product Description

  • Seedling Size:  12-24″
  • Seedling Age:  2-0
  • Mature Height:  5 – 10 feet
  • Mature Width:  5 – 9 feet
  • Soil Type:  Broad Range, Prefers Well-drained
  • Moisture:  Dry, Moderate, Moist
  • Sun:  Full Sun, Partial Shade
  • Growth Rate:  Slow

Key Characteristics of Gray Dogwood

  • In the late spring, white flowers bloom at the tip of the branches.
  • Gray dogwood bark is shaggy.
  • Leaves are simple and alternately arranged on twigs.
  • White berries are produced during the summer on bright red branches.

Vistors Attracted to Gray Dogwood

Help Control Invasives!

Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) by Mokkie

Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) by Mokkie

Gray Dogwood makes a great alternative to invasive honeysuckle species (Lonicera spp.), which replace native plants in high quality natural areas, which in turn reduces critical food resources for birds, butterflies, and other wild creatures. Invasive honeysuckles in particular affect native ecosystems by throwing off the balance. While their flowers do provide nectar to birds and pollinating insects and the berries are food for birds and small mammals, the foliage is unpalatable to most native insects. Songbirds especially rely on insects to feed for their young to survive the growing season (click here for more info).