Black Cherry – Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
Black Cherry LeavesBlack Cherry Fall ColorBlack Cherry Bark

Cherry, Black – 24-36″ – OUT OF STOCK

** OUT OF STOCK ** 

Please email seedlings@gtcd.org if you would like to notified if we can obtain more stock. 

Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) is a 60 to 90-foot-tall native North American tree which has an oval silhouette. It produces small, bitter fruits which mature during summer and fall from red to dark purple or black.

Clear selection
SKU: BC-2436-30. Categories: , .

Product Description

Overview

  • Seedling Size:  24-36″
  • Seedling Age:  2-0
  • Mature Height:  60 – 90 feet
  • Mature Width:  35 – 50 feet
  • Soil Type:  Medium to coarse
  • Moisture:  Dry, moderate or moist
  • Sun:  Full sun or partial shade
  • Growth Rate:  Fast

Key Characteristics of Black Cherry

  • Sometimes used for jams, jellies, or liqueurs, these fruits are highly prized by birds and other wildlife who quickly devour them as they ripen.
  • The finely-toothed, deciduous leaves are dark green and shiny, changing in fall for a short period to lovely shades of yellow, orange, or red, but this varies with weather conditions and among seedlings.
  • The berries stain concrete as they fall in summer. It is recommended to not plant near sidewalks or concrete driveways.
  • The leaves and twigs contain hydrocyanic acid which could poison livestock or other animals if consumed in large quantities.

Visitors Attracted to Black Cherry

  • Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus)
  • Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus)

Help Native Species!

Black cherry is an early and attractive bloomer, supporting pollinators in early spring.

Image Credits 

  • Black Cherry- Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
  • Black Cherry Bark – Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
  • Black Cherry Leaves – Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
  • Black Cherry Flowers – Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org